Trish Martin of Neuroplasticity & Education United to be Featured on CUTV News Radio

JENISON, MICHIGAN, UNITED STATES, July 17, 2018 /EINPresswire.com/ — Our democracy depends on literacy. We need a literate society to be able to make informed decisions. But according to recent national statistics, the current reading proficiency score for fourth graders is 32 percent.

Trish Martin is the founder of Neuroplasticity & Education United, where she works with school districts across the country, training teachers how to teach reading by unlocking the power of neuroplasticity.

“We try to make reading as addictive as a video game,” says Martin. “When kids come to us entering kindergarten, they come wanting to learn.”

After 25 years as a speech pathologist, Martin has spent the last 14 years teaching and promoting the fundamental building blocks of literacy through a revolutionary, scientifically and evidence-based instructional series. She developed the “Neuroplasticity: Rewiring the Brain” series and has authored multiple instructional curriculum books, student workbooks along with extensive support materials and instructional videos. She is now expanding to provide parents the support materials they need to help their child get to the next level.

The English language has 44 sounds and approximately 256 ways to spell them. English has four layers: Anglo-Saxon, Latin, Greek and French. Once we get to fourth grade, the words the child is being asked to read will be 60 percent Latin or Greek in origin.

“The educational system at the university level rarely teaches the subtler aspects of how the language goes together, or how to actually teach a child to read,” says Martin. “We have not provided the necessary instruction to the child for them to be able to read to their potential.”

“If I were to send my granddaughter to a piano teacher, the first thing the piano teacher would do is teach the keys of the piano. So if I'm going to be an elementary teacher, I should probably know how many sounds there are in the English language that I need to teach and understand that words are built by linking syllables together.”

Of course, teachers face many challenges. The brain is a use-it-or-lose-it system; whatever neurological pathways are used the most will build the strongest highways. Children today are spending approximately four hours each day in front of a visual screen. This in turn builds powerful visual roads in the brain. Unfortunately children spend significantly less time than children in prior generations processing oral language and developing their auditory system. They are also spending less time stimulating their imagination which also requires language.

“They have weak roads in the brain,” says Martin. “Once you understand where things live in the brain, you can figure out how to design a task to build that road. We have to train teachers how to do that. You can use any content you want. I use literacy.”

Martin says unlocking the reading code is not just about the children that struggle.

“I have spent years fine-tuning these lessons, so any teacher or parent is capable of improving their child's capacity to read,” says Martin. “Every child benefit, and your high-end reader just explodes.”

CUTV News Radio will feature Trish Martin in an interview with Jim Masters on July 19th and July 26th at 11am EDT.

Listen to the show on BlogTalkRadio. If you have a question for our guest, call (347) 996-3389.

For more information, visit http://www.neued.org

Lou Ceparano
CUTV News
(631) 850-3314
email us here


Source: EIN Presswire